U.S. 39th regiment in Seattle, wear masks to prevent influenza
Coronavirus News

The 1918 Spanish Flu—The Search for the Virus

March 29, 2020

Between adding to the miseries of the First World War, and contributing to the rise of the Second World War, the 1918 Flu had a big impact on human history. What if it were to return today? Would we be prepared to fight it? […]

a nurse tends to Spanish Flu patients at Walter Reed Hospital in 1918
Coronavirus News

The 1918 Spanish Flu—How the Flu Came Back to America

March 28, 2020

Most authorities think that the American flu mutated into a killer during its time in Europe. By late summer, this mutant or hybrid strain was poised and ready to re-enter the United States. Re-entry may have occurred August 12, 1918, from passengers on the Norwegian ship, the “Bergensfjord.” The liner entered New York harbor with 200 people sick; four of them had been buried at sea. All of the passengers who were sick and those who had been exposed went down the gang plank and scattered into the New York City population. […]

soldiers in hospital during the 1918 spanish flu pandemic
Coronavirus News

The 1918 Spanish Flu—Why We Were So Vulnerable

March 27, 2020

Epidemic diseases have often changed the course of human history—the death of a world leader, an epidemic before a great battle—but few diseases have accomplished it through sheer brute force. The deadliest epidemic of all times wasn’t smallpox, wasn’t the Black Death—it was the 1918 Flu. In one year, an estimated 50 to 100 million people died out of a global population of 1.8 billion. In America alone, 675,000 people died of the flu. […]

Marble statue of Octavian displayed at the Chiaramonti Museum, Braccio Nuovo (New Wing).
Ancient History

Octavian’s Reign: How Rome’s First Emperor Thwarted Assassination

December 27, 2019

When Octavian became the leader of Rome, his main goal was not to anger the people and be assassinated as his predecessor, Julius Caesar, had been. Therefore, Octavian’s reign was focused on consolidating power while at the same time maintaining the illusion that he did not have the absolute control that characterized a monarchy. Octavian turned out to be a clever strategist, brilliant leader, and fascinating man. […]

Medieval castle, sword and shield representing noble violance
European History

Noble Violence in the Middle Ages; The Church Mediates

December 27, 2019

Noble violence in the Middle Ages was a huge problem that even the kings could not always control. Discover how the church stepped in, offering a unique solution: the “Peace and Truce of God” movement. Did it work? […]

Polish magnates 1697-1795 (Polish nobility)
European History

Becoming a Noble: Medieval Europe’s Most Exclusive Club

December 27, 2019

Becoming a noble in the High Middle Ages was no easy task. Nobles used safeguards such as bloodlines to maintain their elitist status. Discover why they became so exclusive, and learn of the unique privileges granted to lords. […]

Noble knights statues in wall niches at Buda Castle, Hungary
European History

The Medieval Nobles and Their Fierce Fighting Methods

December 27, 2019

Nobility underwent many changes during the High Middle Ages, and for the first time, knights entered the noble class. Thanks to new technologies, medieval nobles became known as formidable warriors. Learn of their methods as well as the benefits bestowed to nobles. […]

Marble bust of emperor Caligula
Ancient History

Caligula: The Embodiment of Cruelty

December 9, 2019

At the time of his accession as emperor, Caligula was greeted with enthusiasm. Soon, people discovered just how cruel (and possibly insane) he was. What made Caligula one of the most infamous emperors in the history of ancient Rome? […]

Tiberius Portrait - Bust of 2nd Roman Emperor
Ancient History

Tiberius: Ancient Rome’s Reluctant Emperor

December 9, 2019

Tiberius was somewhat reluctant to take charge of the Roman Empire after the death of Augustus. His reign was marked by insurrection in Germany, betrayal by trusted commanders, and seclusion on the island of Capri. Follow the dramatic story here. […]

Caesar Augustus, first emperor of Ancient Rome. Old bronze statue in the Imperial Forum
Ancient History

Augustus: Paving the Way for Hereditary Succession

November 19, 2019

How did the Roman Empire end up with so many maniacal leaders? The answer lies in the actions of Rome’s very first emperor, Augustus, and the precedent he established for how emperors were selected. […]

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