Konstantin Pobedonostsev
History

Konstantin Pobedonostsev—The Crankiest of all Russian Conservatives

December 1, 2017

Konstantin Pobedonostsev, was probably the most powerful and influential intellectual in Russia during the final decades of tsarist rule. From 1880 to 1905, he served as Chief Procurator of the Holy Synod, and in this position he was the layman in charge of administering the entire Russian Orthodox Church. […]

History

Life in the Arab Cluster—What Does it Mean to Be An Arab?

December 1, 2017

What does it mean to be part of the Arab cluster? First of all, to be an Arab is not so much an ethnic heritage as it is a cultural identity. Although it’s similar to what it means to be a North American, that doesn’t entirely capture it either. Let me explain. […]

Bust of Aaron Burr as Vice President (Image: By US Senate/artandhistory/art/artifact/Sculpture_22_00003.htm, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=46112299/Public domain)
American History

Aaron Burr—The Villain Who Killed Hamilton

December 1, 2017

No one could claim a more distinguished intellectual lineage in the Founders’ generation than Aaron Burr, the grandson of Jonathan Edwards. And no one in the Founders’ generation could claim to be a more wicked person. […]

Caesar Crossing the Rubicon (Image: By Ellis, Edward Sylvester/Public domain)
Ancient History

Caesar’s Road to the Rubicon—Rome Goes to War

December 1, 2017

With three large egos involved, it was inevitable that tensions within the triumvirate of Caesar, Pompey, and Crassus would rise. Yet how did the situation deteriorate so drastically that, when Caesar crossed a small river, known as the Rubicon, on January 10, 49 B.C., it was akin to a declaration of war on Rome? […]

Hittite archeological foundings from anatolia (Image: By toronut/Shutterstock)
Ancient History

The Hittites—The First Ancient Empire

December 1, 2017

For half a millennium, from their homeland in central Anatolia, the Hittites played a role in Near Eastern politics equal to the traditional great powers of Mesopotamia and Egypt. […]

The city of Alexandria and the lighthouse.
Ancient History

How Alexander Built Alexandria—The Myth and Legend

December 1, 2017

The Alexandrians were not really interested at all in anything to do with Egypt. They saw their city as a sort of divine foundation of the Greeks. Plutarch tells us that when Alexander came to Egypt, he left behind a large and populous Greek city that would bear his name: Alexandria. […]

American History

Lincoln’s Emancipation Plan—Three Main Features

December 1, 2017

Abraham Lincoln’s emancipation plan had what he called “three main features.” It had to be gradual, it had to pay compensation, and it had to have the vote of the people. In other words, any idea of emancipation should be on a timetable rather than an immediate shock to the system. […]

European History

Otto von Bismarck—Germany’s Iron Chancellor

December 1, 2017

Otto von Bismarck (1815–1898), the “Iron Chancellor,” unified Germany in three wars and came to embody everything brutal and ruthless about Prussian culture. The real Bismarck had a different character—a hypochondriac, a brilliant and well-read man, a convert to an extreme form of Protestant mysticism, and one of the few Prussians who never served in the king’s army. […]

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